Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

Is therapy right for me?
Seeking therapy is an individual choice. Sometimes we are having trouble coping and we are just not able to get understanding or get help from the people we usually turn to. Working with a therapist can provide support, insight or new strategies to deal with all types of life challenges. Therapy may help to prevent problems from escalating or offer new perspectives when a person or relationship seems to be at a crossroads. Therapy offers a unique opportunity to increase self-awareness and take greater responsibility in one's life.

Is medication a substitute for therapy?
In some cases a combination of medication and therapy is the right course of action. If medication is indicated, a psychiatrist or medical doctor can be consulted. Instead of just treating the symptom, therapy addresses the underlying causes of distress. Long term results and improved quality of life are not likely to be achieved by medication alone.

Do you accept insurance?
I accept many insurance plans, often on an "out of network" basis. When you first contact me we will discuss whether or not I am able to accept your insurance policy. If you choose to work with me and I do not take your insurance plan, I generally do my best to adjust my fee so that it is affordable for us to work together.

If you do have mental health coverage, it is important to ask your insurance carrier the following questions:

  • Do I need a referral from a medical doctor?
  • How many therapy sessions will be covered?
  • What is the coverage amount per therapy session?
  • How much co-pay am I responsible for?
  • How much is my deductible?
  • Is therapy confidential?

Is Therapy Confidential?
In general, the law protects the confidentiality of all communications between client and therapist. No information is disclosed without prior written permission from the client. However, there are some exceptions to this rule that are required by law. The therapist must report the following situations to the appropriate authorities:

  • Suspected child abuse or abuse of a dependent or elder adult
  • The threat of serious bodily harm to another person
  • Disclosure of a serious intention to harm oneself

The therapist will make every effort to ensure the client's safety. However, a client's lack of cooperation with a plan for safety requires the therapist to take additional measures.